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How to Reinvent Your Career – Face Your Transition Fears

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping  Companies Assess, Select, Coach and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Talent Management; Leadership Development; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; and Leadership & Team Building Retreats

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach

“The secret to a resilient life in our kind of world is in knowing how to recycle yourself, over and over, letting go of what is no longer you, taking on new strengths, and shaping new chapters for your life, guided by your own emerging vision."- Frederich Hudson, Pamela McLean

Job security has gone out the widow! The future is not the same anymore. Getting ahead in a volatile and unpredictable economy means engaging in a self-makeover with new social media and highly developed emotional intelligence skills. Don’t fear change – embrace it!

People in career transition in these continually volatile times are aware of the need for resilience, and reinventing themselves to thrive and flourish in the new economy. Now career changers must rebound and take the next steps for a sustainable future. They must refocus, get inspired and be creative to align their purpose and passion with the ever-changing needs of the marketplace.

You need the courage and reassurance that the right actions will help you reach your goals. Success awaits those who remain optimistic, and creatively pursue new and rewarding career directions.

Reinvent Your Career

I was recently working with one of my San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching clients. We talked about his focusing on discovering a better sense of self, including his core values and identity. He was energized and motivated to ignite his entrepreneurial spirit.

Most importantly we focused on his overcoming fear, and discovering a sense of purpose...what was truly important to him. He pondered on the following powerful questions. Who am I and what are my core values? What is most meaningful in my life? What am I trying to do with my life? Do I feel fulfilled in my life? Do I use my talents to the fullest extent? Am I realizing my dreams? Positively reinventing yourself can bring happiness and career fulfillment.

Face Your Transition Fears

Overcoming fear is one of the most difficult things we can do as part of our career development. Worry is an unproductive human activity. Fear is a test of commitment and a way to focus your attention on answering the question: “Is this what I really want?”  For example, when we want to start something new, like a career change, we hesitate. Here’s how to move through it.

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear – not absence of fear.”Mark Twain

The Comfort Zone

Facing our fears means stretching ourselves, and stepping outside our comfort zone. Begin by acknowledging the boundaries of your comfort zone. By moving in and out of your current comfort zone, you can grow and expand the size of it. Focus on doing something important to help break out of your comfort zone. You can then renew your emotional resources, and then prepare for another push forward. With persistence you can stretch your limits. 

Shift your attention to the positive and remember why you are doing what makes you uncomfortable. Think how facing your fears could be the best thing that ever happened to you. If you view it positively, fear is a gift. It’s an opportunity. It’s your body saying you’re about to step outside your comfort zone. Give yourself permission to grow, and to become a fully expressed human being.

 

“Fear is adversity tested. The way to overcome fear is to train oneself to be emotionally and mentally fit. How do you approach adversity? Reflect on how you manage your emotions. Find your best emotional pattern and condition it to handle adversity. The way to deal with fear is to find a way to get outside yourself. This usually means living a life of gratitude.” - Tony Robbins

Visualize the End Goal

If you want to overcome your fear, focus on the end in mind. Visualize your ideal career. Visualize yourself in your new job.Visualize happiness and success. Expect a positive outcome. 

Focus on what you feel the most passionate about. Commit to your most important result. Concentrate on what you want. Don’t waste your emotional energy on what you don’t want!  Olympians practice Visual Motor Rehearsal (VMR). They preview their events in their mind which optimizes their body’s performance. Focusing on success creates success in business and life. 

Fail Well

If you have not failed at something, you’re not trying hard enough. If you want to be successful, you have to give yourself multiple chances to fail. It’s been said that success is the first attempt after failure. The biggest failure is to not try again. The more chances you take, the greater the chance for eventual success. Setbacks can help you make future strategic moves.

Take Risks

When you risk, you loosen your hold on what you’re certain of and you reach for something which you’re not sure of, but you believe is better than what you have. Without fear, there is no courage.Thing big and eliminate your career limiting beliefs. 

You have to give up something familiar in order to learn, grow and change. This can feel uncomfortable.  However, living a life in hesitation, avoidance and procrastination is no way to live.  Just ask yourself, “What is the worst that can happen?”

Self-confidence

Let fear energize you to face the challenges head-on. Keeping your self-confidence and optimism high is critical. By revisiting past successes, strengths and accomplishments, you can move forward and conquer your fears. 

Developing a positive sense of self can help you take prudent risks. Peak performance requires confidence.  A positive attitude can overcome fear. Erase the tapes of negative self-talk.  Avoid all self-doubting thoughts which turn into self-doubting language. 

Fear can stem from a lack of confidence. This may be the result of a lack of experience of trying something new.  For example, you may have been afraid of driving for the first time, but after you gained some experienced you gained confidence. Act strong until you feel brave. Let your fear energize you to action. 

"Respect yourself and others will respect you." - Confucius

Action Plan

Ask yourself, “If I want to make this change, what do I have to gain as a result? What’s on the other side?” Can I really stick it out in this job for another five years?  If I don’t leave now, when will I leave?” Focus on your past successes and achievements. They are sources of strength and encouragement. 

Make a list of some of your key accomplishments and then list the barriers to overcome. Write down specific action steps you need to take to overcome them, and then apply those lessons to your current situation. Set a deadline when you will stop analyzing the situation and begin to write an action plan.  Determine which decision will lead you to achieving your goals. Take your action-plan and chunk it down into small steps so that there isn’t any room for failure. 

Concentrate on one step at a time. If necessary, pretend that you have the courage to overcome the anxiety with a “fake it ‘till you make it” approach. Say to yourself, “I’ll just do it.”

Be careful with whom you share your fears and dreams. Make sure you choose people you trust, that can provide helpful advice and encouragement. Prayer and meditation can also be a tool to address fear, stress and anxiety. Muster the courage to feel your fear and do it anyway. The result will be increased self-confidence to tackle new challenges.

Summary

If you want success in your career, you need to build your confidence and overcome fears. Don't give up! Start with a thorough assessment of your values, skills, interests and abilities.

Focus your efforts on your areas of interests and abilities, and develop an action plan by specifying goals and objectives. It is only by focusing on your strengths that you can truly obtain fulfillment and success in your career. A professional career coach can provide objective feedback to help keep you motivated and on-track.

“Your work is to discover your work, and then, with all your heart, to give yourself to it.”- Buddha

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to reinvent themselves? Enlightened leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Do I have the confidence to reinvent myself and face my fears?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their transformational peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you reinvent yourself. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Subscribe to Working ResourcesFREEE-mail Newsletter:
http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard’s Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com
E-mail: mbrusman@workingresources.com
Voice: 415-546-1252

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman


 

Categories: 

Career Reinvention – Leading Yourself through Transition

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping  Innovative Companies Assess, Select, Coach and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Strategic Talent Management; Leadership Development; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; and Leadership & Team Building Retreats

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach

Career Reinvention – Leading Yourself through Transition

The secret to a resilient life in our kind of world is in knowing how to recycle yourself, over and over, letting go of what is no longer you, taking on new strengths, and shaping new chapters for your life, guided by your own emerging vision."- Frederich Hudson, Pamela McLean

Job security has gone out the widow! The future is not the same anymore. Getting ahead in a volatile and unpredictable economy means engaging in a self- makeover with new social media and highly developed emotional intelligence skills. Don’t fear change – embrace it!

Enlightened career changers in these continually volatile times are aware of the need for resilience, and reinventing themselves to thrive and flourish in the new economy. Now career changers must rebound and take the next steps for a sustainable future. They must refocus, get inspired and be creative to align their purpose and passion with the ever-changing needs of the marketplace.

You need the courage and reassurance that the right actions will help you reach your goals. Success awaits those who remain optimistic and creatively pursue new and rewarding career directions.

I was recently working with one of my San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching clients. We talked about his focusing on discovering a better sense of self including his core values and identity. He was energized and motivated to ignite his entrepreneurial spirit.

Most importantly we focused on his discovering a sense of purpose...what was truly important to him. He pondered on the following powerful questions. Who am I and what are my core values? What is most meaningful in my life? What am I trying to do with my life? .Do I feel fulfilled in my life? Do I use my talents to the fullest extent? Am I realizing my dreams?

My executive/career coaching client put the following powerful questions on a Post-it attached to his computer monitor. The questions served as a daily reminder to him that positively reinventing yourself can bring happiness and career fulfillment.

  • If it was impossible to fail, what would be different in my career?
  • What type of job/career would create meaning in my life?
  • What type of company would be the best fit for me?
  • What kind of company culture would ignite my passion?
  • What type of boss/co-workers/team would I like to have?
  • How would I create work/life balance?
  • Would I be happier as an entrepreneur starting my own business?
  • How much money is enough for me?

The case study that follows further elucidates the coaching process and my approach to help clients reinvent their careers.

Executive/Career Coaching Case Study

We are all trying to understand and cope with the enormous changes in our work and personal lives. Mostly we react in a positive and productive manner. However, many people are describing their lives as so busy, working so many hours, trying to balance work and personal lives that we often feel physically and emotionally exhausted.

I work as a consulting psychologist and executive/career coach specializing in helping leaders and lawyers with work- related problems. Let me tell you a brief story about a company leader I helped with a career transition.

Steve was the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) at a San Francisco Bay Area financial institution. He was seen as a high potential during his initial years at the company. Steve was referred by the Director of Human Resources for career coaching. Several employees had given 360 degree feedback that Steve was arrogant and often condescending to others contributing to a negative work climate.  Steve’s behavior was causing a morale program at work. They described the CFO as being critical and demanding. The culture of the company valued openness and collaboration. The company truly valued Steve and wanted him to be happy whether at this job or whatever he might choose to pursue.

At our first coaching meeting, Steve appeared to be fatigued, de-moralized, dispirited, sleep-deprived, and burned out.  He described himself poignantly… “My soul was asleep on the job”. As we explored his situation, Steve related how the company had been through two mergers. There was the imminent possibility of another downsizing (euphemism for firing people). Steve as well as the other “survivors” was overloaded with work.  He had resisted most of the changes, lacked motivation and his feelings were all “bottled up”. Steve was frankly not fully engaged. As I got to know Steve better, it became apparent that he had some good leadership skills, but was unhappy in his work resulting in making coworkers miserable.

Steve’s stated goal was to improve his emotional intelligence and discover work that he loved. The best way to build a healthy personality involves understanding yourself and your emotions. He wanted to become more engaged at work, but eventually to transition into a new career.

The client brainstormed various options on how he could achieve his goals. He asked if I could recommend an article on emotional intelligence and agreed to take the BarOn EQ-i emotional intelligence assessment. Steve scored low in self-awareness, happiness and stress tolerance. Our initial work focused on Steve discovering a better sense of self including his core values and identity.

Our career coaching work together transitioned into Steve learning how to delegate and collaborate with others as a way of building relationships and establishing trust. Considering the work overload, Steve felt it was important for him to learn to prioritize work based on what was truly important.  We began to talk about his values and interests and possible career options.

The client discussed the obstacles that might arise in terms of his resistance to change. We worked on Steve challenging his negative thinking about change which was the major obstacle getting in his way.

I coached Steve by role playing how the obstacles, in this case negative thinking could be managed. He learned to challenge his limiting belief by asking himself “Is it true that I am stuck and have no options”?  Steve learned to focus his energy on what he could control and to live in the present moment. I asked him what he would like to end (corporate job) and explored future possibilities.  Most importantly we focused on Steve discovering a sense of purpose...what was truly important to him. Who am I and what are my core values? What is most meaningful in my life? What am I trying to do with my life? .Do I feel fulfilled in my life? Do I use my talents to the fullest extent? Am I realizing my dreams?

As I got to know Steve better, I discovered that Steve’s real childhood love was art. And that he had gotten into finance in his 20’s as a way of making a living when he first moved to the Bay Area.

Steve created the following homework exercises that would help him develop his emotional intelligence and create the self-insight needed for a career transition. He agreed to begin the following week.

1.  Practice mindfulness meditation. 
2.  Write in my journal. 
3.  Read Victor Frankel's "Man's Search for Meaning", Po Bronson's "What Should I Do with My Life", and “Work With Passion” by Nancy Anderson.

After a few months of career coaching, the client had gained sufficient self-awareness and was more open to change.  Steve decided to dosomething pretty dramatic. Steve told me he was taking a vacation and going to Costa Rica to surf! I was surprised that he was passionate about surfing as it seemed out of character. Upon his return, he told me how he had come upon the idea of starting a business designing surfboards! What wonderful synergy of taking action, tapping into his essence - the love of art and creating an entrepreneurial business of his own. Finally, he was leveraging his considerable strengths of resourcefulness, love of adventure and creativity.

Steve continued to work for the company, but with a new sense of commitment. He was much more positive and happy. 360-degree feedback from co-workers indicated that he had developed more collaborative work relationships. He continued to work part-time on his decorating surfboards business with the goal to transition into his own business in a couple of years and move to Costa Rica.

Summary

If you want success in your career, you must have confidence in your ability to solve problems, practice independent thinking and decision-making and be determined to find the answers. Don't give up! Start with a thorough assessment of your values, skills, interests and abilities. Focus your efforts on your areas of interests and abilities, and develop an action plan by specifying goals and objectives. It is only by focusing on your strengths that you can truly obtain fulfillment and success in your career. A professional executive/ career coach can provide objective feedback to help keep you motivated and on-track.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to reinvent themselves? Enlightened leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Do I have the confidence to reinvent myself and grow?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their transformational peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you reinvent yourself. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

 

 

 

 

Categories: 

Competency-Based Executive Coaching

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Firm Executive Coaching Helping  Companies Assess, Select, Coach and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Strategic Talent Management; Leadership Development; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; and Leadership & Team Building Retreats

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach

Executive Coaching

No one has to change; everyone has to have the conversation.” —David Whyte, Poet

I believe coaching is a collaborative process of providing people with the resources and opportunities they need to self-manage, develop change resiliency and become more effective. Self-knowledge is key to leaders inspiring committed followers.

My clients learn how to have coaching conversations at work that inspire and engage others.
They are introspective and reflective creating a corporate culture that ignites innovation and everyone's best work.

Utilizing online instrumented assessments - clients set clear goals, make optimal use of their strengths, and take action to create desired changes aligned with their personal values and mission.  I utilize a wide variety of assessments in my work with senior executives and am adept at helping clients develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results.

Competencies

Many of the companies I work with have a competency model. If not, I can help them create one that is aligned with their corporate culture and strategic goals.

Executive coaching and leadership development focuses on improving requisite competencies. The competency-based approach is research-supported, and based on the primary goal of defining the critical behaviors needed for effective and superior individual and organizational performance.

Simply defined, a competency is a set of related behaviors that (1) impact job performance; (2) can be measured against established standards; and (3) can be improved through training and development. Competencies provide an internal gyroscope for leaders who model requisite workplace behaviors.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development for emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders? Sustainable leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more compelling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Which competencies are a strength for me?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their leadership development programs.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders end unethical gossip in the workplace. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders. 

Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman
http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

Categories: 

Cognitive-Behavioral Executive Coaching – Thoughts Influence Behavior

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Firm Executive Coaching Helping  Companies Assess, Select, Coach and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Strategic Talent Management; Leadership Development; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; and Leadership & Team Building Retreats

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach

Cognitive-Behavioral Executive Coaching

I recently spoke with the VP of Human Resources of a San Francisco Bay Area company regarding providing executive coaching for the company CEO. She asked some very insightful questions to determine fit. She specifically wanted to know how I worked with different personality styles, and my methods for initiating changes in thinking and behavior.

The VP of HR and I spoke about my approach to coaching, and my belief that possessing a psychological understanding of human behavior based on neuroscience and business acumen are important competencies for coaching executives. We also spoke of the need for her organization to create a culture where innovation flourishes.

The VP of HR is interested in partnering with me in helping the CEO to develop his executive presence, judgment and decision-making capability. We further discussed how company executives can benefit by working with a seasoned executive coach.

Cognitive Executive Coaching

The primary principle of the cognitive approach to coaching is that the client's thoughts influence their behavior. The executive coach helps the client increase their awareness of their "automatic" thinking. Coaching helps the client evaluate if their view of the situation is helpful, and then helps the client identify more accurate and useful ways of viewing the situation leading to more adaptive behavior. The client's more constructive and expanded thinking about his/her particular situation and goals will lead to desired outcomes.

Behavioral Executive Coaching

A stricter, behavioral approach to coaching is less concerned about the reasons why a behavior developed and instead will focus on identifying the desired behavior by taking a step by step approach to identifying specific actions that will lead to more frequent demonstration of the valued behavior or competencies. Behaviors that are recognized and valued will in effect be rewarded and thereby reinforced.

Thoughts Influence Behavior

As an executive coach, I'm often asked by executives to be a collaborative thought partner. As a thought partner, I help my clients think with greater depth, more clarity, and less distortion - a cognitive process. Executive coaching is primarily a cognitive method. Cognitive coaching tools are often the essential foundations of many executive coaches' toolboxes.

However, there is more to executive coaching than a set of methods - cognitive methods or any other. Executive coaching without engaging the humanistic side of a compassionate and trustworthy coach won't likely get desired results. An executive coach who ignores the emotions of his clients will miss a crucial element for success. 

Executive coaches who incorporate emotional intelligence and self-knowledge in their leadership development work know that feelings are to be attended to as potential sources of useful information. Emotional self-awareness producing self-knowledge is a foundation for success in life and work. Even the executive coach who uses largely cognitive approaches must incorporate emotional content. After all, emotions are linked to cognition.

Cognitive Coaching Theory

Cognitive executive coaches believe that your moods are strongly related to, and often triggered by, your cognitions, or thoughts. Cognitions refer to the way you asses a particular situation - your perceptions, mental attitudes, and beliefs. Cognitions include the way you interpret things - what you say about something to yourself. 

Cognitive executive coaching is also informed by what it is not. Cognitive executive coaching does not attempt to help a client by focusing on the past, uncovering repressed ideas and wishes or aiding in the translation of conscious thoughts into their symbolic meanings.

The cognitive executive coach does not work changing behavior by rewards and punishments or gradual exposure to anxiety -provoking events. Rather the cognitive executive coach assists clients in identifying errors in their thinking and aiding them in adopting more accurate, useful cognitions.  Moreover, the cognitive executive coach may identify whether there is an absence of accurate, useful realty-based cognitions, even if specific thinking errors are not identified. 

My Executive Coaching Approach

My personal style of executive coaching is collaborative, holistic, values-based and action-oriented. I focus on the complete person, achieving agreed upon goals which are congruent with their core values and purpose. 

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide cognitive executive coaching for leaders? Sustainable leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more compelling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Would I benefit by working with an executive coach as a thought partner?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their leadership development programs.

Working with a seasoned cognitive-behavioral executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders develop their executive presence and decision-making. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

Categories: 

Strategic Career Reinvention – Ignite Your Career Transition

Working Resources is an Executive Coaching San Francisco Bay Area Firm Helping Companies Assess, Select, Coach and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Talent Management; Leadership Development; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; and Leadership & Team Building Retreats

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach

 

Strategic Career Reinvention – Ignite Your Career Transition


The secret to a resilient life in our kind of world is in knowing how to recycle yourself, over and over, letting go of what is no longer you, taking on new strengths, and shaping new chapters for your life, guided by your own emerging vision."
 - Frederich Hudson, Pamela McLean

Job security has gone out the widow! The future is not the same anymore.Getting ahead in a volatile and unpredictable economy means engaging in a career make-over with new social media and highly developed emotional intelligence skills. Don’t fear change – embrace it!

Enlightened career changers in these continually volatile times are aware of the need for resilience, and reinventing themselves to thrive and flourish in the new economy. Now career changers must rebound and take the next steps for a sustainable future. They must refocus, get inspired and be creative to align their purpose and passion with the ever-changing needs of the marketplace.

You need the courage and reassurance that the right actions will help you reach your goals. Success awaits those who remain optimistic, and creatively pursue new and rewarding career directions.

I was recently working with one of my San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching clients. We talked about his focusing on discovering a better sense of self including his core values and identity. He was energized and motivated to ignite his entrepreneurial spirit.

Most importantly we focused on his discovering a sense of purpose...what was truly important to him. He pondered on the following powerful questions.Who am I and what are my core values? What is most meaningful in my life? What am I trying to do with my life? .Do I feel fulfilled in my life? Do I use my talents to the fullest extent? Am I realizing my dreams?

Brave New World

Today new technologies and increased global competition have eliminated many jobs. With fewer people to do the work and increased competition for jobs, we are putting in longer hours with no relief in sight.

Besides anxiety, depression and eventual burnout other job stresses come from doing work that is not a good fit, or working in an environment that is not conducive to your temperament and values. If you think you need to find another job or change the direction of your career, it is important to go through a process of self-assessment, focusing on your options, and develop an action plan to help you achieve your goals. Your physical, emotional and financial well-being is at stake!

Self-awareness is essential to discovering the right career path for you. The following four steps can help you follow the yellow brick road to a career that maximizes your full potential.

Four Steps

1. Instrumented Assessment

What are your core values? You need work that is aligned with your purpose and core values if you are to feel satisfied and fulfilled. What are your special abilities and skills? What do you consider to be your best traits and characteristics? How do you make decisions? Are you a "big picture" person or one who likes to focus on the details?

Do you have the type of personality that is more suited to a job or an entrepreneurial adventure? Personality assessments such as the Myers-Briggs and Hogan Personality Inventory interpreted by an executive coach often can help with this process.

2. Culture Fit

What kind of work culture is a good fit for you? Do you want flex-time or would you like to work from home? Do you want to be self-employed or need a more structured work environment? What kind of people do you want to work with? Do you prefer to work solo or within a team environment? What type of organizational culture will unleash your energy and help you thrive.

3. Focus and Motivation

After you have completed a thorough assessment of your values, skills, abilities and the environment that you want to work in, consider the content of the work itself. Do you like to counsel others? Do you like to teach? Do you like to write or conduct research? Do you want to manage others or be autonomous and work independently? Make a list of the things you like about your work and the things you don't like. Be specific. The Strong Interest Inventory is a good career development instrument to help focus your interests.

Next you need to match your abilities and skills with the needs of the current marketplace. The competition for jobs today is very stiff. Brainstorm the general career areas that fit your interests. Conduct informational interviews to determine what it is really like to work in those areas. What kind of skills and experiences do you need to have to secure a job in those fields? Are you motivated to make that happen? What about salary requirements?

Perhaps after conducting an honest self-assessment, you decide you really like the work you do and only need to change your environment. If you leave a particular career and decide you don't like your new job, it will be more difficult to return to your former career. It is crucial to go through a thorough self-assessment process before you make a change.

4. Action Plan

Once you know what you want to do, develop a specific action plan to reach your goal. Write it down and keep it visible. If you decide to stay put, create a customized career development plan that includes acquiring the skills and experience you need to further your career. Write your goals and objectives. Update your resume.

Network with those in positions who can provide support and help you achieve your goals. A career coach can help keep you tap into your intrinsic motivation, and stay focused in pursuit of your goals.

Summary

If you want success in your career, you must have confidence in your ability to solve problems, practice independent thinking and decision-making and be highly motivated to find the answers. Be persistent! Start with a thorough assessment of your values, skills, interests and abilities. Focus your efforts on your areas of interests and abilities, and develop an action plan by specifying goals and objectives. Tap into your intrinsic motivation to mobilize your energy and resources.

Focusing on your strengths will help you obtain fulfillment and success in your career. An executive coach can provide objective feedback and support to help keep you motivated.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to reinvent themselves? Enlightened leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Do I have the confidence to reinvent myself, grow and flourish?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their transformational peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you reinvent yourself. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders. Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

Categories: 

How to Focus your Life – The Grow Model

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area  Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

 

How to Focus your Life – The Grow Model


The secret to a resilient life in our kind of world is in knowing how to recycle yourself, over and over, letting go of what is no longer you, taking on new strengths, and shaping new chapters for your life, guided by your own emerging vision."
- Frederich Hudson, Pamela McLean

 

Grow Model

The G.R.O.W. MODEL is so simple, powerful and effective personal and professional development model that can be successfully used in every area of your business and personal lives, reducing interference and accelerating performance. It helps people get into the "zone", where simplicity and genius reside.

The conventional methods of the "Outside In" Model of 'Performance = Capacity + Knowledge' is how most leaders think of improving performance as opposed to the Inside Out approach which provides a breakthrough Model: Performance = Capacity - Interference.

Four Steps

The GROW Modelis a tool you can use to manage virtually any kind of tough conversation. For people familiar with Socratic inquiry, the GROW model is a way to remember each step along the path. It works like this.

The “G” in GROW stands for “goal.” The first thing in a difficult conversation is to establish the goal of the discussion – and its connection to a larger goal for the organization. Maybe it’s to deal with a problem employee or decide whether to discontinue a product line. For example, let’s assume the goal is to deal with a problem employee. As you talk about the goal, it becomes clear that the real goal is to get the employee to make changes to a membership database. Talking first about the goal ensures people are oriented toward the same goal.

The “R” stands for “reality.” The second thing people need to talk about is the current reality. What’s going on? How did we get here? What do we know? What don’t we know? Using the example, the reality may be that people can’t easily update member data, records are inaccurate, and the database can’t import data from other sources.

The “O” stands for “options.” This is the part that people typically jump to before they talked about the goal and the reality! What could we do? Hire a contractor? Change our management approach? Establish priorities for what gets fixed first? Scrap the existing platform? Here’s where people need to engage in creative brainstorming and share their ideas.

Finally, the “W” in GROW stands for “way forward” – as in what will we do and when? This is the time to decide on the next step. It can be the toughest part of the discussion, since people need to commit to action. If the decision is being made consultatively, one person can decide. If by consensus, it can take several rounds of asking each person what they would like to do. But ultimately, people are likely to come to agreement, if only because they’re exhausted! Perhaps the decision is to hire a contractor to assess quality of the database application. That’s the next step.

Learning the GROW model will help you feel more confident and comfortable in managing tough conversations. And that’s a key part of managing decisions well.

Many of my coaching clients put the following four steps in the Grow Model on a Post -it attached to their computer monitor. The Grow Model serves as a daily positive reminder to focus on goals and flourish.

  G= Goals... what are your specific goals in any area of your life

  R = Reality... take a realistic look at the facts related to the goal

  O = Options... based on the facts, what are your options?

  W = Way Forward... based on careful assessment of your Goals, Reality and various
          Options, what is your preferred "Way Forward"?

Research into goal setting shows that goals work best when they are:

·  Positive

·  Possible

·  Precise

·  Personal

·  Measurable

·  Inspirational

·  Manageable in small steps

·  Written down

·  Time-limited

·  Shared with othersfor accountability

Powerful questions to ask yourself include:

What do I want?
What do I want to do differently?
How will achieving this goal make my life better? And the life of others?
What excites me about this goal?
What will I get when I achieve this goal?
What will I notice when I achieve this goal?
What will others notice?
When will I achieve this goal?

One of the most important questions you can ask yourself is “Do I follow a simple, but elegant model to achieve my goals?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their peak performance leadership development program.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who want to achieve significant goals? Enlightened leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you achieve your goals. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman


 

Categories: 

Why life coaching (and other generalized coaching services) are a crock!

If you think about the best athletes, musicians, and even political candidates, they all have something in common. In order to continuously raise the bar in their performance, they engage with the best coaches, trainers, and mentors.

 

There is a growing recognition that coaching is not remedial, but a means of gaining perspective, obtaining specific and regular feedback, and helping to ensure that energy remains directed towards achieving individual goals. Herein however lies the problem. The growing demand has resulted in a plethora of business and life coaches. With so many choices, and low barriers of entry into the coaching profession (even credentials come easy!), how can anyone be sure which coach is the right fit? More importantly, how will you realize the value you expect from the relationship?

 

Based on our coaching work with dozens of clients, as well as having worked with coaches and mentors for nearly a decade, we have identified five key steps we help our best clients apply in order to maximize the return on their investment.

 

Be clear on your purpose: Selecting a coach is a strategic decision intended to progress performance in specific areas, while further exploiting and building upon strengths. Clearly identifying the purpose of entering a coaching relationship, and your desired outcomes, is a must if the relationship is to provide both true value and a return on your investment. Consider the last time you partnered with a business professional such as a lawyer. You reached out to meet with or discuss your needs with a lawyer, ensuring your intent for pursing a relationship was clear. In a coaching relationship, both parties must be clear on the intended outcomes.

 

Preparation requires interaction: Athletic coaches spend considerable time assessing the performance of their team members; identifying strengths and weaknesses. In addition to this assessment, a one-on-one discussion identifying the specific goals and ambitions of the team member is held to allow the coach to create a unique improvement plan that improves on individual weaknesses, exploits strengths, and moves each team member in the direction of their desires. Be wary of personal or professional coaches who use standard online assessments and email discussions to develop a framework for the coaching arrangement. A valuable relationship must be personalized and developed in a personalized setting to gain clarity around the desired outcomes and optimal approaches.

 

You don’t need another friend: An effective learning environment involves mutual respect, honesty, and candor. Most of us experience this form of relationship in academic learning and dealings with doctors, lawyers, and dentists. Information shared may be intimate, but the neutrality of the relationship allows for a dynamic of both challenge and growth, without regard for tarnishing relationships or hurt feelings. A true coaching relationship is not a friendship, and should never evolve into such. The relationship must be one of mutual respect, honesty, and trust if significant outcomes are to be reached.

 

Quality versus quantity: One misconception in a coaching arrangement is that the value of the relationship is based on the time spent with the coach. A quality coaching relationship is one that is based on the value obtained from the discussions and feedback. On average, the discussions I have with my mentor, Dr. Alan Weiss, last no longer than seven minutes. I don’t confuse quantity for quality. If objectives are clear, the time to discuss progress, challenges, and obtain feedback should be brief. If your existing calls with coaches have pre-determined durations, the value of your interactions is poor at best.

 

Don’t wear out your welcome: Achieving intended objectives or improving performance in a specific area requires only a set period of time. If a coaching assignment is to last longer than 90 days, the likelihood of the engagement providing more value to the investor than the coach is slim. Ensure that there is clarity around objectives and measures of success at the outset of the coaching arrangement. Place a fixed duration and “end date” on the arrangement at which time you can assess progress and determine next steps. If a coach is suggesting that you must have a duration of longer than 90 days, or consistently looks to extend your agreement successive times with similar objectives, chances are that the value of the arrangement is not what you desire.

 

Spend time thinking about the purpose of entering a coaching arrangement, including consideration of the five areas above. Armed with this information, you will then be prepared to pursue a valuable coaching arrangement, moving performance to new heights and achieving objectives that once seemed impossible.

 

© Shawn Casemore 2012. All rights reserved.

Categories: 

The Business Case for Executive Coaching- International Coach Federation (ICF) ROI Study

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

 

The Business Case for Executive Coaching- International Coach Federation (ICF) ROI Study

 

The higher up the organizational ladder an executive goes, the less he/she can depend on technical skills and the more one must have effective interpersonal skills and emotional intelligence. Organizations spend large sums of money to hire coaches for top executives in an effort to improve these abilities. Are coaching programs effective in improving bottom line performance in organizations?

Although it was once used as an intervention with troubled staff, coaching is now part of the standard leadership development training for executives in such companies as IBM, Motorola, J.P. Morgan Chase, Hewlett-Packard and many others. Brokerage firms and other sales-based organizations such as insurance companies use coaches to bolster performance of people in high-pressure, stressful jobs. Currently, organizations are looking to recent work on emotional intelligence to augment approaches to executive and management development.

Coaching Study

The International Coach Federation Global Coaching Study Reports that the ROI of Executive Coaching is 700%. The ICF conducted a qualitative and quantitative global client survey and interview research project on the return on investment of executive coaching.  Highlights related to the return on investment from coaching are reported here.  This is a crucial practical research topic -- what do coaching clients say is the value of coaching?

The design phase of the research consisted of three components:  First, fourteen in-depth interviews were conducted with an international sample of coaches to assist with the design of the questions to be utilized in the qualitative and quantitative study. Second, the qualitative research phase consisted of five focus groups with a total of 41 clients participating.  The focus groups allowed for in-depth probing of qualitative issues.  Third, the quantitative research component consisted of 2,165 coaching clients from 64 countries participating in a 20 minute online survey. 

What do clients say motivates them to begin coaching? The clients cited career opportunities and business management as their most important reasons for seeking coaching services.

Both coaches and consumers of coaching services are interested in Return on Investment (ROI) studies on coaching. An often cited ROI study of executive coaching, Coaching for Increased Profitability: How to Deliver and Demonstrate Tangible Results to the Bottom Line by Merrill C. Anderson, Ph.D.  MetrixGlobal (2003) had reported an ROI from coaching of 788%.

In an apparent confirmation of that finding, the ICF Global Coaching Client Study Executive Summary (April 2009) reports, "The vast majority (86%) of those able to provide figures to calculate company ROI indicated that their company had at least made their investment back. In fact, almost one fifth (19%) indicated an ROI of at least 50 (5000%) times the initial investment while a further 28% saw an ROI of 10 to 49 times the investment.  The median company return is 700% indicating that typically a company can expect a return of seven times the initial investment."

Source:  ICF Global Coaching Client Study, Executive Summary, April 2009, in consultation with PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, and Association Resource Centre inc.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders become more effective? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who are motivated to create organizations that flourish? Enlightened leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Can executive coaching help me become a better leader?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders grow and develop their full potential.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help develop emotionally intelligent leaders. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

Categories: 

How to Reinvent Yourself – Mindfulness Meditation and Self-Coaching

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

 

How to Reinvent Yourself

Are you a leader who would like to reinvent yourself and have a more fulfilling life and career? For over thirty years, I have been working with people to discover their purpose and passion to create work that is fulfilling and profitable.

It takes self-awareness, energy and an entrepreneurial spirit to discover your true passion, identity and the work that you are meant to be doing. I have practiced mindfulness meditation for many years and enjoy work serving others that is filled with joy and financial well-being.

I have coached hundreds of people to create happier and more productive work lives.You can choose to work with an executive coach to help facilitate your career reinvention or practice self-coaching.  

Being an executive and career coach has transformed my own life in countless ways. I’ve learned to be more comfortable not knowing and asking impactful questions at home and at work. I’ve become a more compassionate friend and a better listener.

I’ve experienced that shared learning and growing as leaders and people together, and not always having to be the “expert” is less work and more fun. I savor each precious moment in both my personal and professional relationships. I feel more fully expressed and in touch with my deeper self-identity. I believe that when you are in a state of intention "purpose will find you.”

It is easier to go down a hill than up, but the view is from the top.— Arnold Bennett

The Mindful Leader: Sit and Be Still

“For leaders, the first task in management has nothing to do with leading others; step one poses the challenge of knowing and managing oneself.” – Daniel Goleman

Psychologist Daniel Goleman, an authority on emotional intelligence in organizations, calls this the leadership paradox in Primal Leadership:

This includes:

·  Connecting with deep values that guide

·  Imbuing actions with meaning

·  Aligning emotions with goals

·  Keeping ourselves motivated

·  Keeping ourselves focused and on task
 

When we act in accord with these inner measures, we feel good about what we do. Our emotions become contagious. When we, as leaders, feel positive, energized and enthusiastic about our work, so do those we influence.

Honing the skills of awareness leads to mindfulness—becoming aware of what’s going on inside and around us on several levels. Mindfulness is living in a state of full, conscious awareness of one’s whole self, other people and the context in which we live and work.

Recent studies in management science, psychology and neuroscience point to the importance of developing mindfulness and experiencing meditation.

Mindfulness meditation has long been practiced by Buddhists and others seeking greater calm and peace of mind.

Mindfulness meditation addresses a wide range of topics, including:

·  How to heal toxic workplace cultures where anxiety and stress impede creativity and performance

·  How to cultivate courage and confidence in spite of workplace difficulties and economic recession

·  How to pursue organizational goals without neglecting what’s happening here and now

·  How to lead with wisdom and gentleness, not only with ambition, relentless drive and power

Becoming a mindful leader, requires us to explore the intimacy of sitting still and experiencing being you in the moment—in the now.

The greatest obstacle to managing others is lack of self-awareness and the inability to manage ourselves. If you fail to connect with yourself and are constantly “doing,” you’re not in touch or self-aware. You can’t be mindful of others without first being mindful of yourself.

Practicing mindfulness meditation can help you relax and slip into a more calm physical and emotional state.  Enjoying this peaceful place you can ask yourself powerful questions that will help you reinvent yourself.

Mindfulness Meditation Exercise - Creating Resilience and Well-Being


Mindfulness involves awareness, attention and energy .Learning to become more "present" will free you to be more flexible and creative. Mindfulness reduces stress and promotes resilience. You can become more resilient, enjoying better health and well-being.

1. Find yourself a comfortable position with as few distractions as possible.

2. Gently close your eyes and focus your attention inward.

3. Imagine a radiant light dissolving your stress.

4. Take a few easy slow breaths, taking air in through your nose and exhaling through your mouth.

5. Say to yourself, “Alert mind, calm body”.

6. Now take a deep, soothing breath all the way down to your abdomen.

7. As you exhale, let your facial muscles, neck and shoulders relax.

8. Feel a wave of warmth and heaviness sweep down to your toes.

9. Allow the relaxation to re-energize your body and mind.

10. Slowly open your eyes, stretch, and ease back into normal activities.
 

Self-Coaching Questions

The following self-coaching questions can help you become more self-aware and begin to discover your true passions and identity. Engaging in fierce conversations with yourself by asking questions that interrupt long standing patterns can help you reinvent yourself. The careers of many of my coaching clients began to flourish from engaging in this contemplative practice.

1. What makes my life most fulfilling?
2. How can I live my most important values?
3. How can I spend most of my time pursuing my unique interests?
4. How can I use my talents to the fullest extent?
5. How can I make a significant contribution to the world?
6. How can I seek out opportunities to share my gifts with others?
7. How can I design my future?
8. How can I attract my ideal clients?
9. What are my life's dreams?
10. What is my life's legacy?
11. How can I live my life with purpose and vision?
12. How can I realize my dreams?
13. How can I focus on my strengths?
14. What needs to end?
15. What do I need to stop doing?
16. How can I listen more to myself than others?
17. Who am I?
18. What is my true identity?
19. What is my authentic voice?
20. When am I most powerful?
21. What are my core beliefs and what needs to change?
22. What business will fulfill my passion?
23. What are my true values?
24. How do others seem me?
25. What scares me the most?
26. What have I learned from failure?
27. How is my self-esteem and confidence?
28. What makes me happy?
29. What secrets are no longer useful?
30. How can I best make a contribution?
31. Why am I here?
32. How can I be of service?
33. What inspires me?
34. What energizes me?
35. What matters most?
36. How can I live in the present moment?

Self-Coaching Practices

1. Daily meditative practice asking yourself core questions that emerge from your unconscious
2. Journaling reflecting on your personal life experience
3. Vociferous reading on a number of topics including works from philosophy, religion, psychology, history, historical biographies etc.
4. Playing in nature being mindful to pay attention and insights received
5. Fierce conversations with friends, family, and loved ones
6. Personal 360-degree feedback with work colleagues, friends, family, and sometimes even critics!
7. Spiritual practices
8. Extensive travel
9. Formal "purpose" exercises such as those in Stephen Covey's "The Seven Habits of Effective People"
10. Reading books such as Victor Frankel's "Man's Search for Meaning" and Po Bronson's "What Should I Do with My Life"  
11. Embrace the state of possibility
12. Stay in a state of gratitude and wonderment
13. Fall in love
14. Forgive fully
15. Partner with others
16. Stay conscious that life is fleeting and breathe fully into every moment

When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves." —Victor Frankel

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders practice mindfulness meditation and reinvent themselves? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to learn how to have self- coaching conversations? Enlightened leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “How can mindfulness meditation help me reinvent my career?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more effective teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders build high performance organizations. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

Categories: 

Coaching Conversations - Teaching People to Think

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Coaching Conversations

I recently spoke with a director of human resources who was searching for a San Francisco executive coach for the leaders at her company. The director of human resourcesasked some very insightful questions to determine whether we were a good fit. She specifically wanted to know how I worked with different personality styles, and my methods for helping leaders have coaching conversations. She was very interested in my leadership development work with helping executives think better.

The director of human resources and I spoke about my approach to working with leaders, and my belief that better thinking can improve creativity and innovation. We also spoke of the need for her organization to work with a management consultant to help their company create a culture where creativity and innovation thrives.

The director of human resources is interested in partnering with me in helping their leaders have coaching conversations with employees and teach people to think differently. We further discussed how other company executives could benefit by working with a seasoned executive coach.

Teaching People to Think

A century ago, most people were paid for physical labor. The dominant management model was master/apprentice, with the master showing his employees how to perform their jobs.

The Industrial Age introduced systems. Process management became the dominant paradigm, with scientific analysis of linear systems for greater efficiency. Employees were trained to follow, unquestioningly, their bosses’ best-laid plans.

Over the last two decades, the most routine business tasks have been computerized or outsourced. As a result, today’s employees are increasingly hired to think. In 2005, 40 percent of employees were considered knowledge workers; for mid-level management and higher, the number is closer to 100 percent.

Modern leaders must increasingly shift management styles to reflect the needs of a more educated labor force. “Yet we have not significantly reinvented our management models since the time Henry Ford hired a pair of hands and wished they’d left their brains behind,” writes NeuroLeadership CEO David Rock, author of  Quiet Leadership: Six Steps to Transforming Performance at Work.

Generations X and Y have been making major organizational contributions, albeit with different expectations. They embrace personal development, while valuing freedom and independence. They want to work for leaders who will help them fulfill their career potential—mentors who can help them improve their thinking.

 (From www.Constantforeigner.com(2010) based on Edward T. Hall's cultural iceberg model:

http://region10.acui.org/Region/10/conference/2011/presentations/Hall%27s%20Iceberg%20Model%20handout.pdf)

The Iceberg Model

Some leadership experts have adopted the “iceberg” model to describe human performance. This metaphor suggests that some of our behaviors are visible, while most other behaviors, thoughts and feelings lurk below water.

Our work achievements are driven by how we think. Why, then, do leaders focus on what’s superficially visible when addressing employee performance? Evaluations rarely consider the factors that drive habits, nor do managers reflect on employees’ feelings or thoughts.

Many employees are highly capable individuals who want to work—and be—smarter. They’re crying out for help. It’s up to their leaders to learn how to ask the right questions and conduct truly engaging coaching conversations.

Start a Coaching Conversation

If we want people to think better, we must essentially let them do all the thinking. Dr. Rock suggests the following five-step process for establishing a coaching conversation that enables self-directed learning:

1. Let the employee think through his specific issue. Avoid telling him what to do or giving advice. Ask questions about his thought process.

2. Keep him focused on solutions, not problems.

3. Challenge him to expand his thinking and stretch himself, instead of clinging to his comfort zone.

4. Focus on what he’s doing well so you can play to his strengths.

5. Make sure there are clear processes behind every conversation. To be truly helpful, a coaching conversation requires permission to ask questions and explore possibilities.

Posing questions allows you to focus on your employees’ mental processes. Asking them to share thoughts:

·  Helps them find connections in their minds

·  Makes them more self-aware

·  Encourages them to take greater responsibility for solutions

Useful Questions

The following questions can facilitate a constructive coaching conversation:

·   How long have you been thinking about this?

·   How often do you think about it?

·   On a scale of 1 to 10, how important is this?

·   How clear are you about the issue?

·   How high a priority does this issue have?

·   How committed are you to resolving this?

·   Can you see any gaps in your thinking?

·   What impact is thinking about this issue having on you?

·   How do you react when you think of this?

·   How do you feel about the resources you’ve invested thus far?

·   Do you have a plan for shifting this issue?

·   How can you deepen your insight on this?

·   How clear are you on what to do next?

·   How can I best help you further?

None of these questions focuses on the problem’s specific details. Notice how the questions avoid suggesting what employees should think or do. They’re designed to help your people take notice of their own thinking.

Asking Permission

An effective coaching conversation requires an environment where people feel safe enough to explore their thoughts and reach new insights. Four elements should be in place:

1. Permission: “Is this a good time to talk and explore your thinking?”

2. Placement: “Let’s see if you can come up with some ideas in the next few minutes.”

3.  Questioning: “Is it OK if I ask you to share your thoughts with me?”

4.  Clarifying: “Tell me more about this. What do you mean?”

As you approach the most personal questions, ask yet again for permission. People can quickly become defensive and stop listening to you. Asking permission frequently helps people feel safe, acknowledged and respected. Here are some sample approaches:

1.  I get the sense you have more to say about this. Could I probe a little further?

2.  I’d like to have a more open conversation than we’ve had before. Would it be OK to ask you some more specific questions right now?

3.  Can we spend a few minutes brainstorming ideas around this?

4.  I’d like to understand more about your thinking. Would you be OK with talking more about this?

5.  I’d like to discuss some more personal matters. Would this be OK with you?

Empowering subordinates is hard and complicated work. You have to be willing to give up control and let people work through their own thinking. A good leader acts as a guide rather than the all-knowing expert.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders have coaching conversations and teach people to think? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to learn how to have coaching conversations? Enlightened leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “How can I have coaching conversations at work and think better?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more effective teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders build high performance organizations. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

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