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5 Steps to Peak Performance

How do you bring out the best in people? Managers want their people to achieve excellence at work. Leaders and management alike know that without people motivated for peak performance, companies will fail to succeed.

To achieve peak performance — a combination of excellence, consistency and ongoing improvement— one must find the right job, tasks and conditions that match an employee's talent. Therefore, facilitating the right fit becomes one of a manager’s most crucial responsibilities.

Disengaged Or Bored?

Disengaged employees often appear to lack commitment. In reality, we all crave engagement. No one enjoys working without passion or joy.

While many factors cause disengagement, the most prevalent is feeling overwhelmed — or, conversely, underwhelmed. Disconnection and overload pose obstacles to performance, yet they often go undetected or ignored because neither qualifies as a disciplinary issue.

Meanwhile, managers try to work around such problems, hoping for a miraculous turnaround or a spark that reignites energy and drive. They try incentives, empowerment programs or the management “fad du jour,” but with only temporary success.

While it’s impossible to create “flow” moments all day long, any manager can greatly improve on the ability to help people achieve peak performance.

Use Brain Science to Bring Out the Best

While no management guru has found the golden key to unlocking the full panoply of human potential at work, research sheds new light on possibilities.

As far back as a 2005 Harris poll, 33 percent of 7,718 employees surveyed believed they had reached a dead end in their jobs, and 21 percent were eager to change careers.

The situation isn't improving.  In 2014, a surveyrevealed 52.3 percent of Americans were unhappy at work.

When so many people are moving from one job to the next, something is wrong. They clearly have not landed in the right outlets for their talents and strengths.

The better the fit with the job, the better the performance. People require clear roles that allow them to succeed, while also providing room to learn, grow and be challenged.

5 Steps to Boost Performance

Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, author of Shine: Using Brain Science to Get the Best from Your People(Harvard Business Press, 2011), synthesizes research into five steps managers can apply to maximize employees’ performance.

Cited as “The Cycle of Excellence,” it exploits the powerful interaction between an individual’s intrinsic capabilities and extrinsic environment:

1.    Select: Put the right people in the right job, and give them responsibilities that “light up” their brains.

2.    Connect: Strengthen interpersonal bonds among team members.

3.    Play: Help people unleash their imaginations at work.

4.    Grapple and Grow: When the pressure’s on, enable employees to achieve mastery of their work.

5.    Shine: Use the right rewards to promote loyalty and stoke your people’s desire to excel.

Step 1: Select

Examine how three key questions intersect:

1.    At what tasks or jobs does this person excel?

2.    What does he/she like to do?

3.    How does he/she add value to the organization?

Set the stage for your employees to do well with responsibilities they enjoy.

Step 2: Connect

Managers and employees require a mutual atmosphere of trust, optimism, openness, transparency, creativity and positive energy.

A positive working environment starts with how the boss handles negativity, failure and problems. They set the tone and model preferred behaviors and reactions. Employees take their cues from those who lead them.

To encourage connection:

·      Look for the spark of brilliance within everyone.

·      Encourage a learning mindset.

·      Model and teach optimism.

·      Learn about each person.

·      Treat everyone with respect, especially those you dislike.

·      Meet people where they are; most will do their best with what they have.

·      Seek out the quiet ones, and try to bring them in.

When people are floundering, the last thing they need is to have their flaws and mistakes spotlighted. Instead, make sure you understand the real issues.

Step 3: Play

Play isn’t limited to break time. Activities that involve imagination light up our brains and produce creative thoughts and ideas. A playful attitude boost morale, reduce fatigue and bring joy to workdays.

Encourage imaginative thinking:

·      Ask open-ended questions.

·      Encourage everyone to produce three new ideas each month.

·      Allow for irreverence or goofiness (without disrespect).

·      Brainstorm.

·      Reward new ideas and innovations.

·      Encourage people to question everything.

Step 4: Grapple and Grow

Help people engage imaginatively with tasks they like and at which they excel. Encourage them to stretch beyond their usual limits. If tasks are too easy, people fall into boredom and routine without making any progress or learning anything new.

The job of a manager is to be a catalyst when people get stuck, offering suggestions but letting them work out solutions.

Step 5: Shine

Every employee should feel recognized and valued for what he or she does. Recognition should not be reserved solely for a group’s stars.

When a person is underperforming, consider lack of recognition a cause. An employee usually won’t voice feeling undervalued, so you must look for subtle signs. In addition:

·      Catch someone doing something right. It doesn’t have to be unusual or spectacular.

·      Be generous with praise. People will pick up on your use of praise and start to perform for themselves and each other.

·      Recognize attitudes, as well as achievements. Optimism and a growth mindset are two attitudes you can single out and encourage. Look for others.

When you’re in sync with your people, you create positive energy and opportunities for peak performance. Working together can be one of life’s greatest joys—and it’s what we’re wired to do.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put strengths-based leadership into action?Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to build a company culture built on trust? Transformational leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I a transformational leader who inspires individuals and organizations to achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders create a culture where respect and trust flourish.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-i 2.0, Hogan Lead, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture strengths-based conversations in the workplace. You can become an inspiring leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching and leadership development firm helping innovative companies and law firms develop emotionally intelligent and mindful leaders. We help build coaching cultures of positive engagement.

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
 Emotional Intelligence & Mindful Leadership Workplace Expert

I coach leaders to cultivate clarity, creativity, focus, trust, and full engagement in a purpose-driven culture.

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders. 

Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica.

 “Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded rare "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development. Alan Weiss, Ph.D., President, Summit Consulting Group

Are you an executive leader who wants to be more effective at work and get better results?

Did you know that research has demonstrated, that the most effective leaders model high emotional intelligence, and that EQ can be learned? It takes self-awareness, empathy, and compassion to become a more emotionally intelligent leader. 

Emotionally intelligent and mindful leaders inspire people to become fully engaged with the vision and mission of their company.  Mindfulleadership starts from within.

I am a consulting psychologist and executive coach. I believe coaching is a collaborative process of providing people with the resources and opportunities they need to self manage, develop change resiliency and become more effective. Utilizing instrumented assessments - clients set clear goals, make optimal use of their strengths, and take action to create desired changes aligned with personal values.

I have been chosen as an expert to appear on radio and TV, MSNBC, CBS Health Watch and in the San Francisco Chronicle, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Time, Forbes and Fast Company.

Over the past thirty-five years, I have coached hundreds of leaders to improve their leadership effectiveness.

After only 6 months, one executive coaching client reported greater productivity, and more stress resiliency helping her company improve revenues by 20%. While this may depend on many factors most of my clients report similar satisfaction in their EQ leadership competence leading to better business results.

You can choose to work with a highly seasoned executive coach to help facilitate your leadership development and executive presence awakening what’s possible. 

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com

Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com
 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/drmaynardbrusman

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Is Your Employee A DUD?

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In my travels across North America working with teams in manufacturing, distribution, insurance, not-for-profit and even health care, invariably in every successful team there exists one or two people who fail to commit. You likely know who I’m talking about. It’s the employees who constantly complain but do nothing to help the situation; it’s those who never seem satisfied despite how hard you work to address their concerns; sometimes it’s those who lash out against co-workers about their poor performance, failing to recognize that they themselves are not meeting objectives.

Have you ever had an employee like this? Are you working with them now?

I’ve coined the term DUD to capture the essence of these employees. Don’t worry though, the term actually has a meaning and isn’t just some biased statement. In my experience there are several things you can do to help a DUD employee become a more productive and positive member of the team. It takes some work and of course patience, but there is hope.

In this week’s video I describe what I mean by the term DUD, and share the specific strategies that I’ve helped dozens of clients employ in order to continuously improve the performance of their team.

WATCH THE VIDEO HERE

© Shawn Casemore 2017. All rights reserved.

Lessons in Resilience from a Five-Year-Old

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Recently my youngest boy Dylan was sick with everything from a mild fever to stuffy nose and upset stomach. During several sleepless nights, my wife and I were up every few hours to get him water, medication, or just to lay with him and provide a backrub.

What I found surprising was that despite the lack of sleep and being under the weather, when I went into his room in the morning to ask how he was, Dylan sat up quickly and said, “Great!”

Really??

If you’ve had children, the one thing you’ve likely learned is that children are resilient. They can be under the weather, but their attitude and personality is often still quite upbeat.

It struck me while reflecting on how resilient children are that there are lessons to be learned from them that can be applied in building the resilience in a team. After all, most of the CEOs, executives, and business leaders I’ve met recently are seeking new and improved ways to help their teams become more self-sufficient, productive, and collaborative.

Enter team resilience.

The term resilience is defined as the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties. Considering our desire to have our teams and the people on them achieve more and do so while working more effectively with their team members, there must be a level of resilience that exists both on an individual and team basis. To put it bluntly, in order to have a team and team members that can achieve higher levels of performance, we must ensure that the environment itself is one that supports a high degree of resilience.

Considering what makes a child resilient, there are a few things that you may not have thought of in the past.

Children primarily focus on having fun in their daily activities. Even when completing tasks or chores, fun is a natural element of getting their work done.

Children are encouraged while in school and through participation in sports to work in collaborative environments and value the input and ideas of others.

Children focus on what they see and experience.

The parents, teachers, and caregivers who work with children are generally patient, seeking to help the child understand through introspection rather than telling them what they should do without an explanation of why.

So what does this tell us when it comes to building resilience in our teams? Well, at a strategic level we need to consider the environment, expectations, and communications we use.

  1. Leaders need to practice being mentors and guiding employees rather then telling them specifically what to do and when they should do it.
  2. Humor and having fun should be on the agenda to ensure that employees are productive. A study conducted by the Journal of Labour Economics found that employees who are happy at work are 12% more productive than those that aren’t.
  3. Cross-training and various forms of interaction amongst employees that help them understand the roles and responsibilities of others is key to ensuring a greater understanding amongst team members and better collective decision-making.
  4. The ability to try new things, learn from failures, and create memorable experiences is a key component to ensuring resilience. If, for instance, failures are avoided or employees are expected to simply remain at their workstations for fear of lower productivity, there is little ability to navigate unexpected experiences.

There are literally dozens of adjustments and changes that can be made that will build greater resilience in team members.  That said, here is something I’d suggest you try with your team. Ask members individually and then collectively to provide a score between one and five for each of the four areas above. The scoring received will suggest to you where you need to shift efforts in order to build more resilience.

Let me know how you make out. In return, I’ll be sure to send you some additional considerations for building resilience in your team. Email shawn@casemoreandco.com

©Shawn Casemore 2017. All rights reserved.

Gritty Bosses: The True Grit Mindset

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Gritty Bosses

Good bosses are hard working and resilient.They keep employees inspired in good times and bad. Failure is seen as bumps on the way to winning and success.

One of my CEO coaching clients admirably models true grit. She taps into the creative DNA of employeesby helping people weather failure, and instilling optimism that success is just around the corner. She believes in her people and their shared purpose.

Robert I. Sutton, PhD, author of the New York Times bestseller The No Asshole Rule, knows about bosses. In his interesting book, Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best...and Learn from the Worst (Business Plus, 2010) he focuses on how to be a better boss.

 “Gritty bosses are driven by the nagging conviction that everything they and their people do could be better if they tried just a little harder or were just a bit more creative,” Sutton writes.

Such bosses instill grit in subordinates. Without creating the impression that everything is an emergency, great bosses have a sense of urgency.

They are dogged and patient, sensing when to press forward and when to be flexible. As Albert Einstein once stated: “It’s not that I am so smart; it is just that I stay with my problems longer.”

University of Pennsylvania Assistant Professor of Psychology Angela Duckworth, PhD, and her colleagues define grit as perseverance and passion toward long-term goals.

“Grit entails working strenuously toward challenges, maintaining effort and interest despite failure, adversity and plateaus in progress,” they wrote in a 2007 Journal of Personality and Social Psychology paper.

Without becoming discouraging, bosses with grit believe that progress isn’t always good enough—that you can never stop learning or rest on your laurels.

Four Questions to Ask Yourself

True Grit

1. Do you treat work as a marathon or a sprint?

2. Do you look for quick fixes?

3. Do you instill a sense of urgency without treating everything as a crisis?

4. In the face of failures, do you persist or give up?

Dr. Maynard Brusman, Consulting Psychologist
San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coach|
Emotional Intelligence & Mindful Leadership Workplace Expert

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

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How Can I Integrate Millennials into my Organization?

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Statistics have shown that by 2020 Millennials will be the predominant generation in the North American workforce.

What does that mean to your organization? What about your team?

You see, regardless of your age, the reality is that with more Millennials entering the workforce, in conjunction with an increasing number of Baby Boomers remaining employed for longer periods, we are all faced with the challenge of creating a multi-generational workforce that is both aligned and collaborative.

In this week’s video I share a question related to this challenge that I’m often posed after speaking to executives, as well as some exercises you can apply with your team, regardless of their age, in order to improve collaboration and ensure your team functions effectively.

Watch the video HERE

© Shawn Casemore 2017. All rights reserved.

Forget About Millennials; You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet

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Forget About Millennials; You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet

Last week I was asked to speak to a group of Grade 11’s in their careers course about Entrepreneurship. I decided to do so because not only does it allow me a chance to give back to my community, but it also helps me with continuing research on understanding more about the distinctions between various generations.

I can summarize my findings for you quite simply: if you’ve been concerned with how to integrate younger generations into your existing workforce today, then you haven’t seen anything yet.

Now, I’m not here to suggest anything that is bad. Of course each generation brings with them significant value and insights. But to be clear, the freedom and lack of structure that students today are exposed to is in stark contrast to the expectations of most organizations.

For example:

Virtually every student in this Grade 11 class had a smart phone and the phone generally never left their hand, in turn, influencing their ability and desire to pay attention.

When I discussed how to identify a career that supports their desired lifestyle, very few understood what it would actually cost to live (we did an exercise to consider the costs of living following post secondary education).

Approximately 2 out of 12 students actually had a job. They were all in the ages of 15 to 16 years of age.

Driving a car was something they were looking forward to in the coming years, not something they were already doing. No one had plans to have their own car but expecting their parents to provide one.

I could go on, however here’s my point.

The “next” generation to enter the workforce in the next 8-10 years has, once again, very different needs than the generations that exist today, namely:

  • They are more heavily reliant on technology, specifically that which is portable
  • They have a diminished ability to communicate openly in groups
  • Their ability to pay attention continues to diminish
  • Their understanding of authority (for a teacher, boss, parent, etc.) continues to evolve
  • They have increased freedom to come and go as they please and set their own agendas and priorities

How will these distinctions affect your team? More importantly how will this affect your organization and connections with your customers?

It strikes me that we haven’t yet learned from the “shock” of integrating millennials into our workforce, that being that, we need to stop worrying about what’s in front of us and instead consider what’s on the horizon.

Maybe it’s time to start thinking about Generation Z, rather than continue to focus on millennials? After all, 10 years as we know will be here in no time. Are you prepared?

 

© Shawn Casemore 2016. All rights reserved.

Why Employee Conflict Is A Good Thing

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Why Employee Conflict Is A Good Thing

Have you dealt with employee conflict with your team lately? If not then you should be concerned.

Too often leaders try to stop employee conflict before it gets too far, but the reality is conflict is a natural outcome when putting a diverse group of employees together. In fact there are numerous benefits to employee conflict if it’s managed correctly. Watch the brief video below to learn more on conflict management and getting more from your employees. Most Leaders will try and develop the most potential in their employees, but knowing how to see conflict and when to seize the opportunity to allow more creativity to develop or stop the conflict before healthy tension turns into disruptive chaos is a skilled art.

Creative employee conflict can be a good thing

Watch the video HERE: https://youtu.be/fA0Wgf8r16s

Spend time this week helping your team understand what their own natural approach to conflict is so they can begin engaging in healthy conflict and how dealing with employee conflict can driving more creative ideas and solutions. For tools and tips on how to do this email me at shawn@casemoreandco.com.

© Shawn Casemore 2016. All rights reserved.

Socializing at Work

One of my executive coaching clients was having some difficulty at her company determining whether employee socializing at work was a good or bad thing. We had a very lively conversation about the topic. She asked me some questions about the issue, and was interested in my perspective.

I’ve indicated her questions, and my responses below. What do you think are the pros and cons of socializing in the workplace?

1. Do you think many employees socialize with their coworkers?

The modern workplace has become a community center or a "home away from home" where people get many of their social needs met.

Neuroscience research supports the idea that our brains are hard wired to connect with others. We spend so much of our time at work, that it's natural that we develop relationships in the workplace.

Gallup engagement studies suggest that having friends at work is a major reason people keep their current jobs. The relationship with their boss is critical to retention.

2. Do you think most of this socializing happens inside or outside of the office? Or both?

The environments of a number of enlightened workplaces such as Google or Facebook are designed for employees to build relationships. Connecting informally can build trust, foster creativity and engagement and create a happy workplace.

Socializing can be a great way to get to know others, develop empathy and create a high performance culture of people who are happy to work together on significant goals. People can further develop their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills by socializing with others.

Socializing outside of the workplace can be tricky related to maintaining appropriate boundaries. This is especially important for bosses and subordinates.

Exercising good judgment is critical. Get feedback from others to check your version of reality.

3. Can it be beneficial to ones career to socialize with colleagues? How so?

Collaborating with colleagues socially can be very politically savvy building trust and support. It can help team members get to know each other on a personal level ncreasing engagement. It can help when influencing and persuading others is needed to achieve common goals.

Socializing can help you get "the scoop" or inside intelligence on what's happening at the company. On the other hand, some gossip often not based on evidence or data can be harmful to the business enterprise and relationships.

Our brains need some downtime so we can be reenergized and inspired.

4. Can it be detrimental? How so?

Maintaining appropriate roles and boundaries are very important. I've had some executive coaching clients report workplace examples ie. babysitting someone's kids or walking their dog can backfire when something goes wrong damaging relationships. Other employees can experience jealousy or favoritism that can sour relationships.

5. Should employees be careful not to socialize too much with coworkers? How much coworker socializing is good for your career?

Leadership is a lot about displaying good judgment. All things in moderation is usually good advice.

Mindfulness or self-awareness is key to being sensitive to other people and what motivates them. The focus of the workplace is to get work done and execute the company strategy aligned with its’ mission, vision and values.

The right balance of socializing in a specific culture can enhance the mission, and support happy employees who are passionate about their work and fully engaged. Too much socializing can be counter-productive and adversely affect some employees.

Each situation and culture is different. if you love to socialize, and your workplace culture  supports that value in helping work get done than it's positive. Some people are great employees, but more quiet and introverted choosing to minimize socializing which hopefully is respected.

6. What are some smart ways to socialize with coworkers?

Formal and informal company events are great venues for people to get to know one another. Smart connecting involves empathy asking people open ended question about themselves.

Pick up on others level of comfort in getting to know each other. Be inclusive, but respect others desire for involvement or not. Coaching conversations are less threatening when the conversation is fun and playful. Always gauge levels of interest recalibrating when necessary.

7. Anything else?

We live in an evolving world where connecting with others is a social imperative for flourishing, happiness and well-being. Social media (Facebook, Twitter, LinedIn, Google Plus etc.) demonstrate that our brain are hardwired to live and work with others for the common good.

All generations appreciate socializing at work, but the millennial generation in particular value regular involvement with others.

However, some people are more private or take more time to develop trust and open up. Respect and be tolerant of fellow employees who have different views, levels of comfort and desires. The workplace is a happier and more productive place when we display kindness and compassion to one another.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? How is your company culture and climate influenced by employee socializing? Resonant leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Do I socialize at work, and is it helpful or harmful to my career?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their transformational peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you become more self-aware on yourself, and interpersonal interactions. You can become a leader who models emotional and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

© Copyright 2013 Dr. Maynard Brusman
 

 

 

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