Member Login

Motivation

Executive Coaching for High Performance Leaders

Category: 

5 Steps to Peak Performance

How do you bring out the best in people? Managers want their people to achieve excellence at work. Leaders and management alike know that without people motivated for peak performance, companies will fail to succeed.

To achieve peak performance — a combination of excellence, consistency and ongoing improvement— one must find the right job, tasks and conditions that match an employee's talent. Therefore, facilitating the right fit becomes one of a manager’s most crucial responsibilities.

Disengaged Or Bored?

Disengaged employees often appear to lack commitment. In reality, we all crave engagement. No one enjoys working without passion or joy.

While many factors cause disengagement, the most prevalent is feeling overwhelmed — or, conversely, underwhelmed. Disconnection and overload pose obstacles to performance, yet they often go undetected or ignored because neither qualifies as a disciplinary issue.

Meanwhile, managers try to work around such problems, hoping for a miraculous turnaround or a spark that reignites energy and drive. They try incentives, empowerment programs or the management “fad du jour,” but with only temporary success.

While it’s impossible to create “flow” moments all day long, any manager can greatly improve on the ability to help people achieve peak performance.

Use Brain Science to Bring Out the Best

While no management guru has found the golden key to unlocking the full panoply of human potential at work, research sheds new light on possibilities.

As far back as a 2005 Harris poll, 33 percent of 7,718 employees surveyed believed they had reached a dead end in their jobs, and 21 percent were eager to change careers.

The situation isn't improving.  In 2014, a surveyrevealed 52.3 percent of Americans were unhappy at work.

When so many people are moving from one job to the next, something is wrong. They clearly have not landed in the right outlets for their talents and strengths.

The better the fit with the job, the better the performance. People require clear roles that allow them to succeed, while also providing room to learn, grow and be challenged.

5 Steps to Boost Performance

Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, author of Shine: Using Brain Science to Get the Best from Your People(Harvard Business Press, 2011), synthesizes research into five steps managers can apply to maximize employees’ performance.

Cited as “The Cycle of Excellence,” it exploits the powerful interaction between an individual’s intrinsic capabilities and extrinsic environment:

1.    Select: Put the right people in the right job, and give them responsibilities that “light up” their brains.

2.    Connect: Strengthen interpersonal bonds among team members.

3.    Play: Help people unleash their imaginations at work.

4.    Grapple and Grow: When the pressure’s on, enable employees to achieve mastery of their work.

5.    Shine: Use the right rewards to promote loyalty and stoke your people’s desire to excel.

Step 1: Select

Examine how three key questions intersect:

1.    At what tasks or jobs does this person excel?

2.    What does he/she like to do?

3.    How does he/she add value to the organization?

Set the stage for your employees to do well with responsibilities they enjoy.

Step 2: Connect

Managers and employees require a mutual atmosphere of trust, optimism, openness, transparency, creativity and positive energy.

A positive working environment starts with how the boss handles negativity, failure and problems. They set the tone and model preferred behaviors and reactions. Employees take their cues from those who lead them.

To encourage connection:

·      Look for the spark of brilliance within everyone.

·      Encourage a learning mindset.

·      Model and teach optimism.

·      Learn about each person.

·      Treat everyone with respect, especially those you dislike.

·      Meet people where they are; most will do their best with what they have.

·      Seek out the quiet ones, and try to bring them in.

When people are floundering, the last thing they need is to have their flaws and mistakes spotlighted. Instead, make sure you understand the real issues.

Step 3: Play

Play isn’t limited to break time. Activities that involve imagination light up our brains and produce creative thoughts and ideas. A playful attitude boost morale, reduce fatigue and bring joy to workdays.

Encourage imaginative thinking:

·      Ask open-ended questions.

·      Encourage everyone to produce three new ideas each month.

·      Allow for irreverence or goofiness (without disrespect).

·      Brainstorm.

·      Reward new ideas and innovations.

·      Encourage people to question everything.

Step 4: Grapple and Grow

Help people engage imaginatively with tasks they like and at which they excel. Encourage them to stretch beyond their usual limits. If tasks are too easy, people fall into boredom and routine without making any progress or learning anything new.

The job of a manager is to be a catalyst when people get stuck, offering suggestions but letting them work out solutions.

Step 5: Shine

Every employee should feel recognized and valued for what he or she does. Recognition should not be reserved solely for a group’s stars.

When a person is underperforming, consider lack of recognition a cause. An employee usually won’t voice feeling undervalued, so you must look for subtle signs. In addition:

·      Catch someone doing something right. It doesn’t have to be unusual or spectacular.

·      Be generous with praise. People will pick up on your use of praise and start to perform for themselves and each other.

·      Recognize attitudes, as well as achievements. Optimism and a growth mindset are two attitudes you can single out and encourage. Look for others.

When you’re in sync with your people, you create positive energy and opportunities for peak performance. Working together can be one of life’s greatest joys—and it’s what we’re wired to do.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put strengths-based leadership into action?Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to build a company culture built on trust? Transformational leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I a transformational leader who inspires individuals and organizations to achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders create a culture where respect and trust flourish.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-i 2.0, Hogan Lead, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture strengths-based conversations in the workplace. You can become an inspiring leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching and leadership development firm helping innovative companies and law firms develop emotionally intelligent and mindful leaders. We help build coaching cultures of positive engagement.

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
 Emotional Intelligence & Mindful Leadership Workplace Expert

I coach leaders to cultivate clarity, creativity, focus, trust, and full engagement in a purpose-driven culture.

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders. 

Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica.

 “Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded rare "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development. Alan Weiss, Ph.D., President, Summit Consulting Group

Are you an executive leader who wants to be more effective at work and get better results?

Did you know that research has demonstrated, that the most effective leaders model high emotional intelligence, and that EQ can be learned? It takes self-awareness, empathy, and compassion to become a more emotionally intelligent leader. 

Emotionally intelligent and mindful leaders inspire people to become fully engaged with the vision and mission of their company.  Mindfulleadership starts from within.

I am a consulting psychologist and executive coach. I believe coaching is a collaborative process of providing people with the resources and opportunities they need to self manage, develop change resiliency and become more effective. Utilizing instrumented assessments - clients set clear goals, make optimal use of their strengths, and take action to create desired changes aligned with personal values.

I have been chosen as an expert to appear on radio and TV, MSNBC, CBS Health Watch and in the San Francisco Chronicle, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Time, Forbes and Fast Company.

Over the past thirty-five years, I have coached hundreds of leaders to improve their leadership effectiveness.

After only 6 months, one executive coaching client reported greater productivity, and more stress resiliency helping her company improve revenues by 20%. While this may depend on many factors most of my clients report similar satisfaction in their EQ leadership competence leading to better business results.

You can choose to work with a highly seasoned executive coach to help facilitate your leadership development and executive presence awakening what’s possible. 

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com

Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com
 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/drmaynardbrusman

http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

 

 

Categories: 

It's Not as Bad as You Think

Category: 
Are you facing some challenges that seem insurmountable? Have you struggled with reaching some specific goals or ambitions this year? 

I had lunch with a client last week where we discussed some of the challenges he was facing. It began by discussing some challenging customer demands, followed by increasingly erratic and unpredictable swings in revenue, followed by some senior management challenges that were now moving towards likely termination.  Add this to the everyday stresses of owning and managing a $100 million dollar business and needless to say there had been a few sleepless nights recently.

After we discussed these challenges I shared with him some recent experiences that I thought might help to help put things into perspective as they had for me.

First, a long-time friend had recently had a new baby and returning to the hospital to pay a visit reminded me of when my wife gave birth to our two boys. For the days and even weeks that followed the time stood still.

A few days following this trip my wife and I took our boys to a local museum where we were reminded of our good fortune after reading what seemed like an endless list of names of those who had lost their lives in the war. 

With these experiences in mind I offered my client some considerations for him to reflect upon, namely:

1. Always be clear on your "why." It's through our purpose that we find energy, motivation and drive.

2. Retain perspective. Unless you are facing a life or death situation, it's really not all that bad.

3. That which doesn't kill you. Life is growth and it's through challenge that we grow and expand our horizons.

As you spend time this summer with family and friends, take time to reflect upon your progress not only this year, but in life. Creating a broad perspective will often bring about the realization that those things we perceive to be challenges are not as challenging as we might think.

Categories: 

Why Success and Fear go Hand in Hand

Category: 

The other day I was reflecting upon my accomplishments from the past six months, two of which stood out - first the completion and submission of my first book to McGraw Hill entitled Operational Empowerment (due out December 2015), and then a month ago I was accepted as a speaker for T.E.C. (The Executive Committee - a division of Vistage) after nearly six months of vetting.

 

I tell you this not to gloat, but to share something I realized only a few short years ago.  

 

All of the successful people that I know are always pursuing big audacious goals, the majority of which if others knew details of, would seem ludicrous. From extending themselves financially to pursuing opportunities that they really have no idea of how they will ever deliver on if they actually succeed.

 

Successful people are always pursuing things that put a little fear into their heart and constant concerning thoughts on their mind.  

  

Why do they do this?  

 

From the CEO's and Business owners I've known and interviewed for my e-book Journey to Success, it seems to be because they've realized that fear is something they should be constantly in pursuit of if they are going to achieve their goals. The only way to be successful ultimately is to put themselves out there in often the most fearful way. 

 

Upon reflection there is virtually nothing that I can think of that others have achieved in life that didn't involve facing fear. Do you think Thomas Edison was concerned that he might never amount to anything when he was trying to create the light bulb? Do you think Donald Trump was ever concerned that his investments might fail?  

 

The answer of course is a resounding yes. But in both instances they faced the fear and continued to pursued their objectives anyway.

 

What are you not doing today that you should be doing?

 

What could you pursue that would bring you closer to your objectives, but you've been avoiding due to fear?

 

Think about it in this way: When it comes to achieving success, you are your only barrier. 


 

If you want to achieve success in any area of your life, consider that success comes to those who take risks, ignore naysayers and pursue their goals with passion and vigor. If your not scared, you simply might not be trying hard enough.


Categories: 

WHY TEAM BUILDING IS DEAD

Category: 

I'm often asked about how to best motivate teams, the common belief of course being that some type of event or intervention is the best way to energize, invigorate and build renewed collaboration.

 

My experience has been however that although such an event yield some initial benefits, there are few long term benefits that can be realized.


The reason might surprise you.  

 

Team Building as an event doesn't typically make any of the members more enthusiastic about being part of the team, it only serves to bring realization to the fact that the group can work as a team. This may seem sufficient at first blush, but once employees return to their working environment where the same challenges, interruptions, personality conflicts and politics exist, the energy can quickly diminish.

 

The only true means of creating a more collaborative team over the long term is to form a community.  

 

Think about it in this way.  

 

In order to attract and retain the best talent, the key question that must be crystal clear is what's in it for them. Put another way, for individuals to possess a desire to contribute to their team, there must be a clear reason for them to join, stay and get involved.  

  • A community is supported by (not managed by) a centralized body voted in by members.
  • A community recognizes and values all members for their individual contribution.
  • A community will naturally evoke those who threaten the stability or safety of the community.
  • A community ebbs and flows as the needs of the infrastructure shift.

If companies the size of Google and Zappos can do it, why can't you?  

 

Question: How are you creating a working environment that employees actually want to join, participate in and remain a part of?   


Categories: 

IT'S NOT THEM, IT'S YOU

Category: 

During a recent talk for CAFE (the Canadian Association of Family Enterprises) I made the comment that if you're finding it difficult to motivate those around you to have the same ambition and energy you do, there's a good chance that it's not them, it's you.  

 

Now before you get frustrated and unsubscribe, here me out. The most successful entrepreneurs and business leaders are influential, and they become influential by practicing the achievement of commonalitybased on adapting to individuality.

  

Sound complex? It's not and here's why. 

 

Today and everyday, how you react and respond to the people and events around you are influenced by your perceptions. Your perceptions are in turn unique to you, which means that it is rare that your perceptions (and in turn your responses and reactions to events around you) will align completely with others you interact with. 

 

In turn the greater your ability to find commonality by adapting to individuality, the greater your chances of influencing the people and environment that surround you.  

 

If you've ever observed a good politician (I know, it's a stretch), or a likeable car salesman (another stretch!), what you will find is that they are highly flexible in how they listen to, approach and respond to those they interact with. They place intense focus on understanding the individuality of those they interact with in order to find commonality and adapt to it.

 

Finding commonality is based on assessing five separate components as outlined in the graphic below. This is done in the form of questions that you can consider during (or prior to) an interaction with someone.  

 

Here are the questions: 

 

1. Life Experiences: What life experiences have influenced their perceptions of the world around them? 

 

2. Generational Differences: Based on their generation, what are their likes, dislikes and preferences?

 

3. Behavioral Preferences: What behavioral patterns can you spot and how might these influence their perceptions?  

 

4. Thought Patterns: What are their sensory experiences? How do they tend to filter their thoughts?

 

5. Social Environment: What are the attributes of the social environment that they exist in today? 

 



Sound overwhelming? It's not. Take it from someone who started their own business at the age of fourteen and sold cars at the age of twenty-one.

Practicing Influence Adaptation is a crucial component to improving the strength and value of your relationships and your business. 

Categories: 

Motivating People for Peak Performance – Motivational Conversations

Category: 

 

Motivating People for Peak Performance – Motivational Conversations

I’ve learned over the last forty years that my most effective executive coaching and leadership development clients know the “why” of what they are passionate in achieving. They get excited in my office telling me inspiring stories of their hopes and struggles. They have a growth versus fixed mindset, and are optimistic and forward thinking. They live and work on the edge and flourish.

One of my CEO executive coaching clients shared with me the data from a recent company engagement survey, which indicated that far too many employees weren’t engaged with the mission and vision of the company. Employees had too many priorities, and they couldn’t focus their energies.

The CEO wanted to inspire and motivate his workforce. We engaged in a pretty fierce coaching conversation about how to help his leaders develop a more growth-oriented mindset. They needed to learn how to tap into people’s intrinsic motivation.

Many business leaders have lost sight of what motivates people at work. In fact, some companies haven’t updated their incentive practices in years, which means they’re probably struggling to create and sustain high-performing teams.

Motivating without Micromanaging

Most managers want to motivate people to peak performance, but their approach often backfires. In their fervent desire to teach people what they know to be true (after all, it worked to get them promoted to management, right?), some managers enthusiastically over-manage.

Over-management can manifest as micromanagement. When you tell staffers what to do, how to do it, when to do it and why your way is better, you undermine their ability to think for themselves. Instead of enjoying some control over the way they work, they begin to feel powerless and controlled. They many even start to doubt their competency. Their relationship with you deteriorates, as it is now based on compliance and conformity.

Managers who micromanage destroy any chance for their people to find meaning and fulfillment at work. Your staff’s basic psychological needs for autonomy, relatedness and competency remain unfulfilled, prompting them to withdraw and disengage.

The Domino Effect

Autonomy, relatedness and competency are interdependent. When you fail to offer opportunities for learning and growth (competency), you thwart opportunities for autonomy and relatedness. Mess with one and the others fall like dominoes.

Don’t make the mistake of believing your people lack motivation. People want to learn, grow, enjoy work, be productive and make a contribution. They want to enjoy relationships at work. It’s human nature.

When our psychological needs are satisfied, we experience positive energy, vitality and a sense of well-being. We strive for more. You’ve likely experienced this with your hobbies. No one needs to tell you to engage in something you enjoy; you do it because you derive pleasure from it.

Motivational Conversations

Boost employee commitment by conducting a motivational outlook conversation. Ask your people to identify what motivates them to do their work. Your goal is to help them identify motivating factors that have maximum impact and create optimum energy.

Most people identify several reasons for working: from the external (money or status) to the internal (finding meaning, acting on one’s values and ideals, aspiring to a higher purpose). Also, pay attention to the following motivation drivers:

1.    Inherence: I enjoy doing this.

2.    Integration: Work helps me fulfill my purpose as a leader.

3.    Alignment: I value developing people.

Consider negative motivational outlooks:

4.    Imposition: I have to; it’s my job.

5.    Externalization: It’s what I’m paid to do.

6.    Disinterest: I’d rather be doing something else.

Start to regard motivation as a skill—one that can be learned, acquired, encouraged and sustained. Each of us can choose our motivation.

Motivational conversations help people discover different reasons for doing their work. Once they pinpoint their current motivations, they can work toward finding their internal motivations—ideally, those that relate to their values.

It may take several conversations for staffers to deliver their best work through values they truly care about. You can help them see the bigger picture and connect the dots to feeling valued.

Remember: People are already motivated. You can provide a culture that encourages higher levels. Don’t succumb to organizational systems that favor driving over thriving. It doesn’t have to be that way.

You can develop the qualities of motivational leadership by working with a professional coach. The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence the future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put motivational leadership into action? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to be more conscious, and tap into the intrinsic motivation of followers? Inspiring leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I a motivational leader who inspires individuals and organizations to achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop a motivated workforce.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture mindful conversations in the workplace. You can become an inspiring leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
Mindfulness & Emotional Intelligence Workplace Expert

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman
http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/drmaynardbrusman
http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

 

 

 

 

 

How to Motivate the Millennial Workforce

We coach leaders to cultivate, creativity, clarity, focus and trust in a full engagement culture.

How to Motivate the Millennial Workforce

Who Are the Millenials?

Generation Y (the New Millennials)were born between 1980 and 2000 (estimated to be 80–90 million). Born to Boomer and early Gen Xer parents into our current high-tech, neo-optimistic times, these are our youngest workers.

Millennials are technologically adept, agile learners and tend to be impatient. They are currently 38% of the workforce, but they will be 75% of the workforce by 2025. 

Motivating Millennials

What's different about how Millennials are motivated at work? The key for motivating Millennial employees is understanding how the Millennials view the world and using that knowledge to help them be at their best. Accept them and don't try to force them to be like other generations. Tap into their intrinsic motivation aligned with core values.
Millennial employees are willing to put in the time to do the job, however they are uninterested in superficial "face time" at work - the concept that just being seen working long hours is impressive and valued.  While Baby Boomers tend to see time as something to invest to get ahead, the younger generations view it as a valuable currency not to be wasted. These are the generations that expect work-life balance and paid time off. They want to get the job done, and then enjoy life.

Managing Millennials

What if you get to manage and coach some of the bright and energetic Millennials who have landed jobs at companies like Facebook, Amazon or Google? What works?

For example Facebook has over 5,000 of the smartest young and motivated employees anywhere.  According to one executive at Facebook, at least 20% of employees get to work with an Executive Coach! Millennials highly value coaching to improve their performance.

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, says that they hire people to do what they love, "We hire trailblazers, hackers and pioneers. We want people who can solve challenging problems, make a real impact and build something big."

Common values of Gen Y are often cited as, "values driven", "need to know why", and "peer oriented".  Facebook values are described as: "Be bold", "Be open", "Get feedback constantly", "Build social value", and "Make the world a better place".

To motivate employees at Facebook there is a flat structure, few offices or cubes, personalized benefits, and a wellness center that employees feel free to use at any time of the day. Healthy food is free and as is dry cleaning.

Developing Milllennial Leaders

Useful development questions at Facebook, Google and at other organizations that are full of socially conscious Millennials are:

1. What will you do today and this week to personally connect the people around you with our mission?
2. What will you do today to best leverage your core strengths at work?
3. Ask your peers, what could you do today and this week to create even more positive impact?  (At Facebook teams are purposely structured as small so that the individual can have a big impact.)

Facebook leaders believe that 20 percent of one's leadership development comes from informal coaching, formal individual executive coaching, mentorship programs, topical brown bag meetings. "Hackathons" where people work through the night (but with the one rule that you can't work on your day job are prized events for motivated Millennials.

Facebook has been rated by employees as the number one place to work by the independent Glassdoor evaluation company.  Facebook's values a leadership and coaching culture - focused on the values of their employees. The payoff is an extremely engaged workforce.

Facebook employees are bright, genuine, and driven people. Employees believe the company and leadership truly want to make the world a better place. It's a healthy and fun work atmosphere that enables people to reach their potential. Employees are empowered take risks and make a real impact. Friends are encouraged to also come to work there.

You can learn how to better motivate millennial employees by working with a professional coach. The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence the future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Business consultant Cam Marston presents further insights into motivating Millennials in Motivating the “What’s in It for Me?” Workforce (2007, John Wiley & Sons). Marston suggests you tap into the Millennia’s intrinsic motivation and values to achieve success.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders better motivate millennial employees? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to be more positive about the millennials? Mindful leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I aleader who motivates young individuals to achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise? ” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop their millennial employees.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture millennial employees. You can become a more mindful leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman


Consulting Psychologist and San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coach

Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams



Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent and mindfu leaders. 

Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.



“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching 



For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman

http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: 

How Managers Create “Flow” Experiences

Flow States

Are you working in an organization where managers help employees enter into flow states to be more productive? Do employees at your workplace believe that their managers help create a workplace where flow states are nourished?

I coach a number of managers on how to creatively encourage flow states to increase performance. Emotionally intelligent managers increase worker productivity by helping their people achieve flow states resulting in improved work place performance.

Myth: Happiness leads to “flow” experiences.

When you are deeply involved in your work, nothing else seems to matter. You lose track of time—a state known as flow. Smart managers know that flow is a particularly fertile work condition.

Flow experiences are periods of deep concentration during which workers report feelings of gratitude and satisfaction. Can managers take steps to create this state? Absolutely.

To enter into flow, employees must be:

•  Challenged
•  Goal-directed
•  Provided with feedback
•  Allowed total concentration and creativity

Flow will materialize only when managers give their employees sufficiently challenging tasks and the necessary time to apply creativity without distractions and interruptions.

The Real Truth: Flow is most likely to be experienced at work and requires periods of intense concentration, without distractions. Managers can ensure that working conditions allow such concentration and minimal interruptions.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to help employees be more productive? Does your organization provide executive coaching to help leaders improve performance by allowing workers time for uninterrupted concentration and creativity? Enlightened leaders need to improve their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “How can I create a workplace culture where flow states flourish resulting in increased worker performance and productivity?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching for leaders to improve their ability at setting goals.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you create a more productive workplace where employees achieve difficult goals and are happy. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman
http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

 

Categories: 

Goal Setting Improves Worker Happiness

Goal Setting

Are you working in an organization where managers help employees develop goals to be more productive? Do employees at your workplace believe that company developed goals help them become more productive?

I coach a number of managers on how best to do goal-setting. Emotionally intelligent managers increase worker productivity by helping their people develop goals resulting in improved work place performance.

Myth: Tell employees to do their best, and let them find their own path.

A mountain of evidence shows us that people perform best when they’re given goals:

  • Specific goals increase performance.
  • Difficult goals, when accepted, result in higher performance.
  • Feedback leads to higher performance.

When you give an assignment with instructions to “do your best,” you aren’t providing enough specificity. Employees perform better when they know what needs to be done, the outcomes you seek, and how much effort they’ll need to expend to achieve results.

The Real Truth: A large percentage of employees believe they lack specific goals at work. Clear, challenging goals, accompanied by feedback, set the stage for higher output.

Myth: People want to set their own goals.

In spite of the logic behind participatory management, there’s little evidence to show that goals set in partnership, between employee and manager, are superior to those unilaterally assigned by the boss.

Why wouldn’t people do better with goals they help set?

The explanation may lie in the reality of workplace conditions. For participation to work:
•  There must be adequate time to give input.
•  Issues must be relevant to employees’ interests.
•  Employees must have adequate knowledge and skills to share their insights.
•  The workplace culture must support employee involvement.

These conditions are sorely lacking in many workplaces, despite management’s best intentions. In addition, some people don’t want the responsibilities that come with participation. They prefer to be told what to do and let the boss do the worrying.

The Real Truth: Participation is no sure means for improving employee performance.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to help employees be more productive? Does your organization provide executive coaching to help leaders improve performance by developing specific goals? Enlightened leaders need to improve their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “How can I set specific and difficult goals that increase worker performance and productivity?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching for leaders to improve their ability at setting goals.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you create a more productive workplace where employees achieve difficult goals and are happy. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.
For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman
http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

 

Categories: 

How Managers Undermine Employee Performance

Employee Performance

Are you working in an organization where managers know how to motivate people? Are managers held accountable for listening to their employees and addressing any complaints?

I coach a number of managers who consistently complain about certain employees, but don’t take the time or make the effort to address any underlying concerns. Effective managers listen to their employees, and are open to any feedback that will improve work place performance.

Spend enough time in meetings or the executive lunchroom, and you’re destined to hear your fair share of managers’ complaints about their employees.

But as these leaders vent their frustrations, they’re actually looking in the wrong direction.

Here’s the real truth: If employees aren’t motivated, then we should look to their managers and organizational practices. Those who dismiss their teams’ grievances can sabotage staff performance and bottom-line results.

If you want your employees to perform to their best abilities, take some advice from organizational behavior expert Stephen P. Robbins, PhD, author of The Truth about Managing People (FT Press, 2007).

Contrary to much of the misleading, generalized and inconsistent information found in business books, Robbins has researched human behavior and provides practical advice on what works—and what doesn’t—when managing a team.

As Robbins points out, traditional workplace incentives and disincentives function as cues for employee decision-making:
•  “Do ____, and you'll get a bonus.”
•  “Don't do ____, or you'll get fired.”

This approach discourages employees from examining the reasons why a task may or may not make sense. It forces them to make quick, intuitive decisions based on behaviors the system has historically rewarded and punished. But there are sometimes uninvited consequences.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development for leaders at all levels? Does your organization provide executive coaching to help leaders improve their ability to motivate employees to improve performance? Enlightened leaders need to improve their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I able to motivate people to perform at high levels?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching for leaders to improve their ability at motivating their workforce.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you learn how to tap into peoples’ passion. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.
Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman
http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

 

Categories: 

Pages

 
Box 1009, East Greenwich, RI 02818
Phone: 401-884-2778
Fax: 401-884-5068
info@summitconsulting.com
 
© Society for the Advancement of Consulting. All Rights Reserved. Web Site Design and Hosting by
WebEditor Design Services, Inc.